Sascha Bailey, son of iconic photographer David, describes how close he came to becoming a woman and fears for other young people like him: ‘Society has a gun to its head. ‘Either you are in favor of children changing their gender or you are transphobic’

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Written By Daily Mail

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At the peak of his unhappiness, Sascha Bailey was so desperately depressed that he considered taking his own life.

But Internet chat rooms convinced him there was another way out of his despair: he could transition into a woman.

Sascha’s vision was to become “a real-life Barbie,” with pneumatic curves and long blonde hair.

Had the 29-year-old son of renowned photographer David Bailey and his fourth wife, model Catherine, spent his entire life believing he was trapped in the wrong body?

He insists not. Instead, thoughts of becoming a woman began to arise as the art curator endured a volatile and difficult marriage, becoming so deeply depressed that he could barely get out of bed.

Sascha Bailey has revealed that he was once so depressed he contemplated taking his own life, but internet chat rooms suggested he become a woman (pictured in 2022).

Sascha Bailey has revealed that he was once so depressed he contemplated taking his own life, but internet chat rooms suggested he become a woman (pictured in 2022).

David Bailey, Catherine Bailey and their son Sascha Bailey in 1999 at the Barbican Art Gallery

David Bailey, Catherine Bailey and their son Sascha Bailey in 1999 at the Barbican Art Gallery

David Bailey (left) and his son Sascha Bailey attend the Royal Academy Of Arts Summer Exhibition 2018 preview party

David Bailey (left) and his son Sascha Bailey attend the Royal Academy Of Arts Summer Exhibition 2018 preview party

“Transitioning was a way of committing suicide without dying, because I wasn’t happy with my life,” he says exclusively to the Mail. “I thought if I could do this, I could change everything, I could reinvent myself as a completely new person.”

Sascha was so convinced that this was the right course of action, and so eager to speed up the process, that he saw a private doctor, who confirmed that he was transgender and prescribed female hormones as a prelude to gender-affirming surgery.

However, 15 months later, Sascha sits in front of me, not as a woman but as the handsome young man he has always been.

Fueled by her family and the love of a new partner, photographer Lucy Brown, 32, has stepped back from the brink of a life-changing and, she now believes, potentially ruinous decision.

To say he is deeply grateful is an understatement. In fact, his enormous relief is the reason why, with extraordinary candor, he opens up about this deeply personal topic, determined to use his experience for what he believes is the general good.

He is easy company, with a charming smile, but you can still feel his vulnerability.

“I think there is a big problem with the overdiagnosis of gender dysphoria,” says Sascha. “It’s obviously very real for some, but I think there are a lot of people who, like me, aren’t really trans, they’re just incredibly unhappy and transitioning is a way of becoming a new person, which they think will fix everything.

‘This new person will not have the old problems or the old social expectations. But of course, that’s not really true.

Sascha knows that by speaking out so bravely she may become a target for trolls. “But no one can say it’s not my lived experience,” she says. “I’m just speaking from the heart about something I know.”

Sascha Bailey (pictured with ex-wife Mimi Nishikawa in 2014) was once so desperately depressed that he contemplated taking his own life before investigating transitioning to womanhood.

Sascha Bailey (pictured with ex-wife Mimi Nishikawa in 2014) was once so desperately depressed that he contemplated taking his own life before investigating transitioning to womanhood.

David Bailey has photographed everyone from supermodels to the Queen during his long career.

David Bailey has photographed everyone from supermodels to the Queen during his long career.

Sascha's vision was to become

Sascha’s vision was to become “a real-life Barbie,” with pneumatic curves and long blonde hair.

Sascha knows that by speaking out so bravely she may become a target for trolls. “But no one can say it’s not my lived experience,” she says. “I’m just speaking from the heart about something I know.”

All this, of course, seems very far from a glamorous upbringing.

Sascha’s father David, now 86, counts famous beauties Catherine Deneuve and Marie Helvin among his ex-wives, and has a portfolio of extraordinary fashion and celebrity portraits.

Sascha’s mother, Catherine, to whom David remains married today, is also a famous model.

Along with her older siblings Fenton and Paloma, Sascha grew up in bohemian privilege between London and the Bailey estate in Devon. The family is united.

“Growing up with my parents was fantastic: they were both inspiring people,” she says, recalling a household that was no stranger to celebrities.

“I remember Ronnie Wood telling me at an event to tie people’s shoelaces and shoe designer Manolo Blahnik kicking me, which was well deserved as I knocked someone to the ground as a result. “, smile.

Dyslexic, Sascha was privately educated at a specialist school in London, leaving at 16. Within a year, having inherited his mother’s fine bone structure and dark complexion, he had signed with the renowned Storm modeling agency.

By then he was already living with an older girlfriend. “I was going through a rebellious phase and just wanted to go out and do my thing,” she says.

Then, at age 19, after returning from several months of modeling in Japan, she met lawyer Mimi Nishikawa through a mutual friend. She was 20 years older than him, but this was no obstacle to an instant attraction.

“She was magnetic and charming, and we just bonded,” he says. “I think we were both a little lonely too, and I guess we found each other.”

Of the age difference, he says, “It caught my attention, but honestly, that part was never a problem for me, and it still isn’t.”

In any case, the relationship developed with astonishing speed: within three months the couple were married at the Camden registry office with only two witnesses (Sascha’s best friend and Mimi’s roommate) despite misgivings. of friends and family.

“A lot of people told me it was a bad idea, but when you’re in that kind of area, you have blinders on,” he says.

‘I know people were worried, although my dad laughed and said, ‘Do what you want.’ He got married around the same age, so what could he say?

The marriage was quite happy at first and the couple settled in Whitechapel, east London.

However, over time it became increasingly toxic.

“It got to a point where it was pretty terrible,” he says. “There were a multitude of problems, and in…

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