Slave art from the Jersey occupation on display at the Tapestry Gallery

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Written By BBC News

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The artwork is now displayed at the Occupation Tapestry Museum.

Jersey Heritage senior registrar Helena Kergozou said Mrs Huelin “risked everything by allowing Bill into her home”.

She said: “She took him in and he stayed there for a few weeks… She kept him busy, provided him with art supplies so he could pass the time and stay busy… She played with him and really let him be.” “She part of her family for a while.”

Burriy was an air force officer who had been captured by the Germans while advancing through Russia in 1942.

Kergozou said he and hundreds of his comrades were herded onto freight trains and taken across occupied Europe to St Malo and then on a ship to Jersey.

They were put to work as slaves, building walls, bunkers and defenses all over the island. Mr Burriy was sent to the stone quarry and crushing plant at the foot of Mont Pinel in St Ouen, but escaped. They quickly recaptured him, beat him, and forced him to stand in a tank of ice water overnight.

But that made him even more determined and he escaped again, this time for good. Aided by the farmer René Le Mottée, he remained hidden until he was taken in by the widow Louisa Gould, who ran a shop in Millais.

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